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How to Use X-Rite ColorChecker Passport in Lightroom CC

Photo Moment - May 24, 2019

Step 2 — Convert the RAW to DNG

The ColorChecker app will only read DNG files, so you have to convert your RAW to DNG first. Of course if your camera shoots DNG, then you can skip this step. If you don't already have it, download the free Adobe DNG Converter here

Launch the DNG Converter app, and at the top of the window that opens, select the folder with the RAW photo in it. You don't need to change any of the settings; by default it'll create the DNG in the same folder that the RAW is in, and that's fine.

The Adobe DNG (Digital Negative) Converter appThe Adobe DNG (Digital Negative) Converter app

Click Convert, and that's it! Once you see a dialog that it's completed, you can quit the app.

Step 3 — Create the Color Profile

If you haven't already installed the ColorChecker Camera Calibration app, you can get it here (click the Training and Support tab). As of this writing, the version you download is v.1.1.3, however as soon as you launch it for the first time, it'll update to version 2.

Launch the app, and simply drag the DNG file into the main window. The software will attempt to locate the color chip chart and it'll draw a grid over it automatically.

Just drag your DNG photo into the ColorChecker Camera Calibration app and it'll take over from thereJust drag your DNG photo into the ColorChecker Camera Calibration app and it’ll take over from there

I've never seen it not work on any decent photo of the chart, but if it doesn't for you, click the arrow with a + on it in the top right corner of the window, and click each of the four brackets around the color chips. That'll draw a box, and you can align if if necessary with the chips by dragging the corners. It's pretty obvious what you need to do once you start, and it doesn't matter which corner you start with. The app will figure out which color is where.

Once the grid is in place (again, it should be automatic), click the Create Profile button. It will automatically want to save to the CameraProfiles folder, which is a good location if you're also going to use this profile in Photoshop or in Lightroom Classic, because that's where those apps will look for it. If you're not using it anywhere else, then just put it on the Desktop, making it easier to find later.

You can save the profile to its default location if you're going to use it in other Adobe apps; otherwise, just put it on the Desktop so it's easier to find laterYou can save the profile to its default location if you’re going to use it in other Adobe apps; otherwise, just put it on the Desktop so it’s easier to find later
Note: Once you import this profile to Lightroom, it's stored inside the Lightroom library package, which is not anywhere that you can save to at this point. I was hoping to find a way to skip a step and just save this profile somewhere that Lightroom would read it automatically on next launch, but you'd have to dig into the package to do that, and since components of the package are synced with the Adobe cloud, this sounds like a bad idea. So I recommend not trying to skip a step, and just doing this as intended.
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